GOOD NUTRITION ACCORDING TO AGE AND GENDER

Special post for people who are curious on what kind of nutrition foods to feed individuals with different classes of age and gender. Let’s review!

BABIES

Food provides the energy and nutrients that babies need to be healthy. For a baby, breast milk is best. It has all the necessary vitamins and minerals. Infant formulas are available for babies whose mothers are not able or decide not to breastfeed.

Infants usually start eating solid foods between 4 and 6 months of age. Check with your health care provider for the best time for your baby to start. If you introduce one new food at a time, you will be able to identify any foods that cause allergies in your baby. Some foods to stay away from include

  • Eggs
  • Honey
  • Peanuts (including peanut butter)
  • Other tree nuts

TEENAGERS

Yes! The old saying ‘you are what you eat’ has a lot of truth to it. Eating a balance of good foods, coupled with regular physical activity,
will help you:
  • Feel great
  • Function at your full potential
  • Maintain a healthy weight
Eating well doesn’t have to mean eating flavourless foods. It’s about getting the balance right. Eating regularly and eating a mix of foods from all the food groups will help you get the fuel and nutrients your body needs.
It’s also a good idea to watch the amount of foods you are eating which are high in fat and sugar such as take aways, cakes, biscuits, chips and soft drinks. Often they are full of kilojoules (or calories) but low in useful nutrients. It’s still okay to eat these foods occasionally – just try to keep the balance in favor of foods from the five food groups.

ADULTS/ELDERLY ADULTS

For older adults, the benefits of adopting a healthy diet include increased mental acuteness, resistance to illness and disease, higher energy levels, faster recuperation times, and better management of chronic health problems. As we age, eating well can also be the key to a positive outlook and staying emotionally balanced. But healthy eating doesn’t have to be about dieting and sacrifice. Whatever your age, eating well should be all about fresh, tasty food, creativity in the kitchen, and eating with friends and family.

Here is the simple breakdown:

Fruit – Focus on whole fruits rather than juices for more fiber and vitamins and aim for at least 2 to 3 servings each day. Break the apple and banana rut and go for color-rich pickings like berries or melons.

Veggies – Color is your credo in this category. Choose antioxidant-rich dark, leafy greens, such as kale, spinach, and broccoli as well as orange and yellow vegetables, such as carrots, squash, and yams. Try for 2 to 3 cups or more of veggies every day.

Calcium – Maintaining bone health as you age depends on adequate calcium intake to prevent osteoporosis and bone fractures. Older adults need 1,200 mg of calcium a day through servings of milk, yogurt, or cheese. Non-dairy sources include tofu, broccoli, almonds, and kale.

Grains – Be smart with your carbs and choose whole grains over processed white flour for more nutrients and more fiber. If you’re not sure, look for pasta, breads, and cereals that list “whole” in the ingredient list. Older adults need 6-7 ounces of grains each day (one ounce is about 1 slice of whole grain bread).

Protein – Adults over 50 without kidney disease or diabetes need about 1 to 1.5 grams per kilogram (2.2lbs) of bodyweight. This translates to 68 to 102g of high-quality protein per day for a person weighing 150 lbs. (0.5 g of protein per lb. of body weight is close enough). Try to divide your protein intake equally among meals. It’s important to vary your sources of protein instead of relying on just red meat, including more fish, beans, peas, eggs, nuts, seeds, milk and cheese in your diet.

MALE

Males of all ages can benefit from eating a balanced and varied diet, getting enough calcium, avoiding high fat and sugar content (like fast food), drinking six 8-ounce glasses of water, and exercising daily. However, if you are worried about your personal nutrition or weight, talk with your doctor about your concerns. There are many diets and supplements that can be dangerous to your health. Although everyone is encouraged to eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day, men should actually be shooting for nine!

Unfortunately, most men are in danger of not eating enough of this important food group.

Men aren’t eating enough fruits and vegetables.

  • Men eat only about 4 1/2 servings of fruits and vegetables a day on average.
  • Only 4 percent of men say they eat the nine servings of fruits and vegetables a day as recommended as part of an active lifestyle.

Men aren’t aware of the benefits.

  • Men are significantly less likely than women to recognize the health benefits of fruits and vegetables, such as their role in reducing the risk of many cancers, heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes.

Why eat fruits and vegetables?

  • Fruits and vegetables provide vitamins, minerals, and fiber your body needs.
  • They are packed with hundreds of disease-fighting phytochemicals – natural substances that work as a team to protect good health.
  • Pills and supplements cannot provide all these nutrients together.
  • Different color fruits and vegetables all contain an array of disease-fighting phytochemicals that work together with vitamins and minerals to protect our health. Although everyone were advised to eat vegetables everyday, men especially, needs to eat a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables everyday.

FEMALE

A healthy diet gives you energy, supports your mood, maintains your weight, and keeps you looking your best. It can also be a huge support through the different stages in life. Healthy food can help reduce PMS, boost fertility, combat stress, make pregnancy and nursing easier, and ease symptoms of menopause. Whatever your age, committing to a healthy diet will help you look and feel your best so that you stay on top of your commitments and enjoy life.

  • Focus on whole, plant-based foods. Diets such as the Mediterranean diet that emphasize fruits and vegetables, seafood, and healthy fats can help control your weight and reduce your risk for certain diseases. Carotenoid-rich fruits and veggies, such as tomatoes, carrots, sweet potatoes, melons, and peppers, may even reduce your risk for breast cancer. Add leafy green vegetables and a variety of whole grains, beans, and other legumes to give you filling fiber and keep you going throughout the day. Try to find organic, minimally processed, or locally grown foods whenever possible and make these foods the mainstay of your diet.
  • Bone up on calcium. Women are at a greater risk than men of developing osteoporosis, so it’s important to get plenty of calcium to support your bone health. Dairy products are high in calcium and recent evidence suggests that consuming whole-fat dairy can also have beneficial effects on weight control. Consider plant-based sources of calcium like beans, broccoli, kale, Brussels sprouts, and collard greens as well.
  • Make sure you get enough iron. Many women don’t get enough iron in their diet. On top of that, women lose a lot of this important mineral during menstruation. Boost your intake by eating iron-rich foods such as red meat, dark poultry, lentils, spinach, almonds, and iron-fortified cereals.
  • Cut back on alcohol and caffeine. Women who have more than two alcoholic drinks a day are at higher risk of osteoporosis and postmenopausal breast cancer. Caffeine consumption interferes with hormone levels and also increases the loss of calcium. Both alcohol and caffeine can also worsen PMS and menopause symptoms and adversely affect fertility. Try to limit alcohol consumption to one glass a day and caffeine to one cup a day.
  • Cut down on sugar. Sugars that are not found naturally in foods contribute zero nutrients but lots of calories to your diet. Naturally occurring sugars are found in products containing milk (lactose) and fruit (fructose), while added sugars can be found in the most unexpected foods, often hidden in the ingredients list as agave nectar, cane crystals, corn sweetener, crystalline fructose, dextrose, evaporated cane juice, high-fructose corn syrup, invert sugar, maltose, malt syrup, and more.

Source: http://www.helpguide.org // http://www.nutrition.gov

 

 

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